OSHA's Standards on Fire Protection in the Workplace

When it comes to Fire Protection in the Workplace; there are several guidelines to be followed. One could go by common sense, but it is not usually sufficient, which is why OSHA has standards relating to Fire Protection in the Workplace.

Like it does for all its safety requirements; OSHA requires the employer to take obligatory steps for the protection of employees from fire. These are covered in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 1910 Subparts E and L; and Part 1926 Subparts C and F.

Employer obligations are the core of Fire Protection in the Workplace

Requiring employers to carry out roles during a fire emergency and training employees towards the same are the foundation of OSHA standards on Fire Protection in the Workplace. Training employees on OSHA's standards on Fire Protection in the Workplace entails training them on all the core areas of handling a fire:

  1. The ways of using fire exits
  2. The ways of using fire extinguishing equipment
  3. The ways by which to organize an emergency exit plan
  1. The ways of using fire exits:

    Fire Protection in the Workplace on fire exits involves having to put in place a well-designed exit route for employees, so that they escape during a fire easily. These should be done keeping in mind the structure of the building. Keeping the exit route free of obstacles is another important requirement of OSHA's standards on Fire Protection in the Workplace.
  2. The ways of using fire extinguishing equipment:

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    Having portable fire extinguishing equipment is not mandatory for OSHA, but employees must be properly trained on their use, should an employer have one. These equipment have to be placed at a convenient location for everyone to access easily.
  3. The ways by which to organize an emergency exit plan:

    An emergency exit plan is required as part of Fire Protection in the Workplace for some kinds of employers. It is for those whose activity involves the heavy use of hazardous chemicals, where paper is used at work, where fire is a common occurrence at work and where ovens, stoves and other implements are used in the normal course of work. Such places of employment should also prominently display the names of chemicals that are used at that particular workplace.

Preparing for an emergency exit

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Another core requirement of Fire Protection in the Workplace is to make all necessary arrangements and take precautions for how to facilitate safe exit for employees during a fire. OSHA requirements on Fire Protection in the Workplace has details of how to make the fact of a fire outbreak known, how to shut down operations, how to ensure that workers are evacuated safely, and so on.