General Safety and Health Provisions are required under both OSHA and 29 CFR 1926.20

General Safety and Health Provisions are listed out in both Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and 29 CFR 1926.20, the latter of which relates to General Safety and Health Provisions for contractors. An examination of the two provisions:

First, a look at General Safety and Health Provisions set out in 29 CFR 1926.20

29 CFR 1926.20 is dedicated to General Safety and Health Provisions. Section 107 of this Act, which is about adherence to a specific legislation - the Reorganization Plan Number 14 of 1950 - specifies that it is the duty of a contractor to ensure that accidents are prevented at the construction site. General Safety and Health Provisions set out in 29 CFR 1926.20 requires that a contractor should maintain the following:

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General Safety and Health Provisions relating to OSHA

Interestingly, OSHA has more or less the same General Safety and Health Provisions as stated in 29 CFR 1926.20. OSHA requires the display of prominent signboards and symbols at construction sites.

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So, what is the rationale for the same General Safety and Health Provisions to be spelt out in two different sources of law? The logic is simple: General Safety and Health Provisions set out in these two sources have to be applied by the relevant industries under which they come. 29 CFR 1926.20 makes General Safety and Health Provisions part of its main purpose of ensuring compliance with construction standards, while for OSHA, adherence to General Safety and Health Provisions is the core aim.

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General Safety and Health Provisions have to thus be implemented in tandem in relation to these two legislations. These carry separate penalties whenever there is a violation of these provisions.