Ensuring Patient Safety in Surgical Environments is Critical for Healthcare Providers

A critical component of patient safety relates to surgical environments. Surgical theaters are prone to causing a high degree of harm. This can be from a number of sources. Patient safety in surgical environments can be from any microbe or fungus in any of the accessories used during surgery, such as ECG machine, the echo machine, or other related ones.

A host of external factors can impinge upon patient safety in surgical environments

Patient safety in surgical environments can also be compromised on account of the use of infected items such as swabs, sponges, knives, forceps, needles, catheters, tubes or any other such accessories or instruments.

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Patient safety in surgical environments can also get affected by the presence of microscopic allergens and molds in any bedding or clothing item. Even germs transmitted from the caregivers can be a source of lack of patient safety in surgical environments.

Another major source where patient safety in surgical environments can suffer is when items are left behind in patients��� bodies by the surgeon. There have been innumerable cases of entire surgical items being left behind in the patient, even in the best hospitals, when surgery is performed by the best surgeons.

Get a proper understanding of the underlying causes

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What do all these point to? These point to the fact that all the factors mentioned above are manmade and are preventable. So, understanding the root of the problem is the key to ensuring patient safety in surgical environments.

East and west carry differences

Any approach to a solution for ensuring patient safety in surgical environments has to start with the understanding that different healthcare and surgical environments exist in different parts of the world. A surgical environment in Germany for instance is vastly different from that in say, Ghana. So, an individualized approach is what is needed.

It is to be noted that generally in the developed countries, processes and systems are more firmly rooted and in place. The examples of sources that cause patient safety in surgical environments to suffer, such as those mentioned above, are far fewer in the west than in the developing countries. So, in the developed countries, what is more important to imbibe is a culture of patient safety in surgical environments.

On the other hand, in the less developed parts of the world, there has to be greater stress on putting safety systems and tools and protocols in place. Of course, this is a very generalized observation. There are many hospitals in the developing world in which patient safety in surgical environments is nearly on par with that in the west. This is more a general point and is meant to serve as an indicator of the optimal approach to take.