Webinar Pack Price
Offer Price: US$1,953.00
You Save: US$1,953.00 (50%)*
Regular Price: US$3,906.00

Webinar Packs Access recorded version only for one participant; unlimited viewing for 6 months.
(For Customize Webinar Packs Please Call Customer Care)

Instructor : Jugna Shah
Product Id : 20180PACK

Overview: Medicare release of the final CY 2017 OPPS rule is critical for providers to understand so they can be ready to implement all changes by January 1, 2017 while also obtaining a keen sense of where they can expect to see financial impact on their book of business. Many of the expected changes if finalized could have tremendous financial and/or operational impact on providers. The final rule is typically released around November 1st which gives providers less than 60 days to be ready for the new year's changes. Joining for this program will allow providers to be ready

Why should you Attend: It's better to know what changes CMS has finalized so that providers are ready to implement new coding or billing requirements such as the use of new modifiers, etc. Additionally, providers will have a sense of what payment rate changes/shifts are expected for individual services (by CPT code, such as evaluation and management visits, observation, drugs, etc.) and/or for Comprehensive APCs, which are like mini-outpatient DRGs or episodes. Knowing where the largest changes are can help finance directors, hospital CFOs, coding, billing, reimbursement, and compliance staff be ready for impact on their organizations.

Areas Covered in the Session:
  • All major financial and/or operational changes finalized by CMS for CY 2017 OPPS
  • Status indicator changes
  • Packaging changes
  • Comprehensive APC (mini-DRG) changes
  • Payment changes for drug administration, E/M visit codes, observation, composite APCs, drugs, biologicals, radiopharmaceuticals, blood and blood products, as well as other major APC category payment rate changes
  • Changes related to reporting modifiers and much more!
  • Observation Notice Act changes if released
  • Section 603 related technical and operational changes for grandfathered vs. non-grandfathered provider-based off-campus locations
  • And much more!


Who Will Benefit:
  • Health Information Management
  • Revenue Cycle Directors
  • Finance
  • Billing Office
  • Charge Description Master Coordinators
  • Others in the hospital interested in understanding the changes CMS has finalized for CY 2017.
Jugna Shah is a Nationally recognized expert in health care policy and financing reform and the founder of Nimitt Consulting, Inc. Since 2001, Nimitt Consulting has specialized in providing information and education on regulatory initiatives and policies that affect health care service delivery, quality, cost, accessibility, and compliance.

In the U.S., Ms. Shah works with a variety of hospitals and health systems to address the clinical, operational, and financial challenges they face under Medicare's payment systems - specifically, Medicare's Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS), based on Ambulatory Payment Classifications (APCs). She helps providers address and overcome complex coding, billing, revenue cycle, and compliance issues, with a focus on medical and radiation oncology, pharmacy and drug coverage, radiology, use and refinement of E/M visit guidelines, and more. In addition to working with providers, Nimitt Consulting provides expertise on reimbursement and policy to drug and device manufacturers, trade associations, and law firms.

A successful advocate, Ms. Shah has raised important payment system concerns to the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) and the federal Advisory Panel on APCs. Many of her recommendations have been accepted and implemented by CMS, thereby making the APC system not only operationally simpler but also more equitable for providers nationwide. Nimitt Consulting Inc. also works internationally on case-mix design, system development, and implementation initiatives. Ms. Shah has led several World Bank and US Agency for International Development (USAID) health care financing reform initiatives that involve providing long-term policy and technical assistance to foreign governments. She has worked in Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Iceland, the Republic of Moldova, Romania, Turkey, and Slovakia. Since 2007, Ms. Shah has served as Secretary for Patient Classification Systems International (PCSI), an international case-mix organization and was recently elected to Vice-President.

Ms. Shah is a popular and dynamic educator who regularly presents on OPPS, APCs, and related topics. She is a frequent speaker at local, regional, national, and international conferences including the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), HCPro, and Ingenix. She is also a lead instructor at the PCSI case-mix summer school held annually in June. As part of her commitment to education, Ms. Shah helped create several of the field's leading publications on OPPS/APCs, including HCPRO's APC Answer Letter, The APC Weekly Monitor, and Briefings on APCs. She is also the author of several books, including OPPS Drug Administration Strategies: Your Comprehensive Guide to Accurate Coding, Billing and Charging and The Drug Revenue Toolkit.

Prior to founding Nimitt Consulting, Inc., Ms. Shah was a senior manager with KPMG's Assurance-Based Advisory Services Practice, guiding providers through the clinical and financial implications of APC implementation. Previously, Ms. Shah worked with 3M Health Information Systems as an Ambulatory Care Product Marketing Manager. She holds a Bachelors of Science in Biopsychology from Oberlin College, and a Masters of Public Health Policy & Administration from the University of Michigan.
Instructor : Joseph Wolfe
Product Id : 20180PACK

Overview: In this session Mr. Wolfe will provide an overview of the Stark Law and its 2016 changes. He will also discuss best practices for implementing and auditing physician compensation arrangements to minimize liability exposure and penalties, including conducting compliance audits, instituting policies, and establishing ongoing monitoring and review processes.

Why should you Attend: Healthcare reform has invigorated the government's focus on healthcare fraud, including enforcement of the Stark Law. Improper design and implementation of physician arrangements can result in penalties, denial of payments, and exclusion from federal health care programs. Thus, ensuring Stark Law compliance will be critical for medical groups, hospitals and health systems looking to manage areas of enterprise risk. Health care organizations should periodically audit their existing arrangements to ensure they are compliant with Stark's technical requirements and key tenets of defensibility (e.g., fair market value, commercial reasonableness, and not taking into account designated health service referrals, etc.) in case their physician compensation arrangements are ever challenged.

This webinar will offer best practices for implementing and auditing physician compensation arrangements to minimize liability exposure and penalties, including conducting compliance audits, instituting policies, and establishing ongoing monitoring and reviews.

Areas Covered in the Session:
  • Provide a general Stark Law Overview.
  • Explain the requirements for compliance with key regulatory exceptions.
  • Summarize the recent changes to the Stark Law for 2016.
  • Discuss the audit process and how to resolve issues that may arise during the audit process.

Who Will Benefit:
  • In-House Counsel
  • Health Care Compliance Officers
  • Health Care Human Resources
  • Health Care CFOs
  • Health Care executives

Joseph Wolfe is an attorney with Hall, Render, Killian, Heath & Lyman, P.C., the largest health care focused law firm in the country. Mr. Wolfe provides advice and counsel to some of the nation's largest health systems, hospitals and medical groups on a variety of health care issues. He regularly counsels clients on a national basis regarding compliance-focused physician compensation and alignment strategies. He is a frequent speaker on issues related to the physician self-referral statute (Stark Law), hospital-physician transactions, physician compensation governance and health care valuation issues. Before attending law school at the University of Wisconsin, he served as a combat engineer in the United States Army.
Instructor : Joseph Wolfe
Product Id : 20180PACK

Overview: In this session Mr. Wolfe will provide an overview of the Quality Payment Program, including its MIPS and Advanced APM pathways. Mr. Wolfe will provide a straight-forward, practical explanation of key provisions and options for clinicians and health care leaders as they navigate the 2017 transition year and beyond.

Why should you Attend: Going forward, clinicians and health care leaders need to be developing strategies so they can position their organizations for financial success under the new Quality Payment Program. Beginning in 2017, CMS will start rewarding clinicians for their delivery of high-quality patient care through one of two pathways:
1. Payment of incentives for participation in Advanced Alternative Payment Models (Advanced APMs)
2. Application of a positive or negative adjustment pursuant to the clinician's performance under the new Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). CMS is allowing clinicians to pick their pace of participation for the 2017 performance year.

They will have three flexible options to submit data under MIPS and a fourth option to join an Advanced APMs in order ensure they will not trigger a negative payment adjustment in 2019. This webinar will focus on the Quality Payment Program, its pathways and potential options for clinicians as they navigate the Quality Payment Program during the 2017 transition year and beyond.

Areas Covered in the Session:
  • Provide a general overview of MACRA and the CMS Quality Payment Program.
  • Explain the consolidation of historic incentive programs into MIPS and provide an overview of the underlying MIPS scoring methodologies.
  • Discuss qualifying Advanced APMs and the process for earning program incentives for APM participation .
  • Describe strategies for engaging key stakeholders, and for picking your pace in the transition year.
  • Discuss potential strategies for incentivizing physicians in connection with the rollout of the new Quality Payment Program.

Who Will Benefit:
  • In-House Counsel
  • Health Care Compliance Officers
  • Health Care Human Resources
  • Health Care CFOs
Joseph Wolfe is an attorney with Hall, Render, Killian, Heath & Lyman, P.C., the largest health care focused law firm in the country. Mr. Wolfe provides advice and counsel to some of the nation's largest health systems, hospitals and medical groups on a variety of health care issues. He regularly counsels clients on a national basis regarding compliance-focused physician compensation and alignment strategies. He is a frequent speaker on issues related to the physician self-referral statute (Stark Law), hospital-physician transactions, physician compensation governance and health care valuation issues. Before attending law school at the University of Wisconsin, he served as a combat engineer in the United States Army.
Product Id : 20180PACK

Overview: We will review the various elements of the physician recruiting agreement and the income guarantee agreement, focusing on the pitfalls and the problems that can develop when the agreement does not clearly define the relationship, and/or when the parties do not fully understand what is being agreed to.

Such items as term and termination, payback, forgiveness, are all items that should be clearly set out in the agreement and fully understood by the parties.

Why should you attend: Formal written contracts establish the legal relationship between the parties; they state the terms and conditions of that relationship and the rights and obligations of each party. They confirm the intentions and relationships of the parties as they enter into this relationship, and they eliminate uncertainties regarding mutual rights, obligations, and relationships. What does an income guarantee mean and what obligations does it impose on the parties. What are the implications of these agreements and how do they stand up under the requirements of Stark and the Anti-Kickback statute?

You should attend to gain an understanding of what should and what should not be in a physician recruiting agreement.

Areas Covered in the Session:
  • Groups as a party to the agreement
  • Term and termination
  • Termination for Cause
  • Income guarantees
  • Payback
  • Covenant not to compete
  • Duties of the physician
  • Breach by the hospital
  • Referral to hospital
  • Promises made by the hospital

Who Will Benefit:
  • Physicians
  • Healthcare executives
  • Physician practice managers
William Mack Copeland MS, JD, PhD, LFACHE, practices health care law in Cincinnati at the firm of Copeland Law, LLC. He is also president of Executive & Managerial Development Group, a consulting entity providing compliance and other fraud and abuse related services. A graduate of Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law, Bill is a frequent author and speaker on health law topics.

Copeland is a member of the American Health Lawyers Association, American, Ohio and Cincinnati Bar Associations and is a life fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives. He was awarded the American College of Health Care Executives Senior-Level Healthcare Executive Regent’s Award in 2007.
Product Id : 20180PACK

Overview: Practicing medicine is not like other jobs that have a tradition of retirement at age 65. Physician shortages fuel support for physicians seeking to continue their careers indefinitely. Patient safety is paramount, but is it served by applying an age limit to medical staff membership and clinical privileges?

If so, what is the magic number?

Why should you Attend: Can medical staffs and hospitals place restrictions on physicians based on age?

Should hospitals and medical staffs place restrictions on physicians based on age?

Can physicians sue, alleging discrimination and civil rights violations?

Areas Covered in the Session:
  • Age Restrictions on Medical Staff membership and clinical privileges
  • State Laws affecting physician age restrictions
  • Federal laws affecting physician age restrictions
  • Accreditation requirements related to age-based credentialing
  • Implementation of age-based screening
  • Eligibility for peer review protection

Who Will Benefit:
  • Medical Staff President/Chief of Staff
  • Bylaws Committee
  • Credentialing Committee
  • Chief Medical Officer
  • Vice President of Medical Affairs
  • Chief of Staff
  • Director of Medical Staff
  • Medical Staff Attorney
  • Hospital Counsel
  • Medical Staff Manager
  • Credentialing Specialist
  • Human Resources professionals
Elizabeth Snelson works for medical staffs and medical societies across the country. Medical staff bylaws are a primary focus of her practice. She also handles "disruptive practitioner" procedures, peer review problems, and other compliance matters.

A frequent speaker on medical staff legal issues, Elizabeth Snelson presents at medical staff leadership retreats and serves as an expert witness in credentialing and Data Bank cases. She is Past President of the American Society of Medical Association Counsel, and past Vice President of the ABA’s Physician Issues Interest Group. She was a member of the Joint Commission’s Task Force on medical staff bylaws. Her articles on medical staff legal issues have appeared in various publications. She is the author of The Physicians’ Guide to Medical Staff Organization Bylaws, published by the American Medical Association.
Instructor : Daniel F. Shay
Product Id : 20180PACK

Overview: Social media presents a double-edged sword for physician practices. As with many businesses, social media can be an effective platform for self-promotion and for creating relationships with customers. However, when addressing use of social media and social media policies, physician practices face specific problems that many other businesses do not, including HIPAA compliance concerns, avoiding improperly establishing a physician/patient relationship through online interactions, managing their business’ reputation, and developing effective and appropriate social media use policies for their own employees.

This presentation explores the risks involved in navigating HIPAA compliance in a social media setting, including discussions of how improper disclosures can occur on social media, how such disclosures can rise to the level of a breach, and how physician practices should attempt to meet their HIPAA requirements online.

The presentation also discusses how to avoid incurring medical malpractice liability in the course of communicating over social media, both in terms of communications with established patients, and with regards to avoiding the imposition of a "duty of care" by establishing a physician/patient relationship based on social media interactions with individuals who are not yet patients.

With the proliferation of online ratings and patient feedback sites, physicians and physician practices must be careful in managing their online reputations. With this in mind, the presentation discusses the risks involved in interactions on review sites, and addresses how best to respond to negative reviews.

To effectively mitigate these risks, physician practices need to establish clear policies to govern the actions of their employees in regards to social media, and to address these risks. However, doing so requires careful drafting, with an eye towards compliance with National Labor Review Board (NLRB) guidelines. Towards this end, the presentation discusses the NLRB guidelines and how to craft around them, and offers practical tips in how to train employees with regards to social media usage relating to their work.

Why should you Attend: As attractive as a social media presence may seem for marketing purposes, physicia practices must be careful in how they approach social media. Even if a physician practice opts not to have a social media presence, they will still need to cract policies and procedures for managing the social media activity of their employees and contractors. While many physician practices have a good understanding of how to address HIPAA requirements in an office setting, they may be less prepared to deal with the ways in which patient protected health information may be improperly disclosed or used in a social media setting.

Physician practices face further risk with respect to medical malpractice risk arising from communication over social media, both with respect to established patients, and in terms of avoiding accidentally creating a duty of care by establishing a physician/patient relationship through social media interactions. In this era of customer-written ratings websites, physician practices must also manage their reputation online, while navigating the restrictions of HIPAA and avoiding malpractice liability. Lastly, while proactive practices may opt to create strong social media policies to govern their employees’ behavior online, they may unwittingly overstep their bounds, as determined by Federal labor laws.

Areas Covered in the Session:
  • HIPAA risks in using social media.
  • Creation of physician/patient relationships and avoidance of liability.
  • Reputation management.
  • Crafting effective social media policies.

Who Will Benefit:
  • Physicians
  • Practice managers
  • Compliance officers
Daniel F. Shay is an attorney with Alice G. Gosfield and Associates, P.C. His practice is restricted to health law and health care regulation focusing primarily on physician representation, fraud and abuse compliance, Medicare Part B reimbursement, and HIPAA compliance in the physician context. He also has a keen interest in intellectual property issues, including copyright, trademark, data control, and confidentiality. He has also focused his attention on provider control of commerce in data, electronic health records license agreements, physician advertising, enrollment in Medicare, quality reporting and quality measurement, physician use of non-physician practitioners, and physician use of social media. Mr. Shay received his Bachelor of Science degree cum laude in 2000 from Vanderbilt University and his juris doctorate degree from Emory University School of Law in 2003.

Mr. Shay is admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar, is a member of the American Health Lawyers Association, and is the Vice Chair of Research and Website for the American Health Lawyers Association's Physicians and Physician Organization Practice Group.
Instructor : Shauna B. Itri
Product Id : 20180PACK

Overview: A whistleblower or qui tam action can provide financial rewards to individuals who are retaliated against for providing information that a company, hospital or individual has defrauded the government. The primary statutes under which this relief may be sought are the federal and state False Claims Acts ("FCAs"). State and federal governments pay hundreds of billions of dollars each year for pharmaceutical drugs, medical devices, hospital care, and nursing home care through Medicare, Medicaid, and other programs. Thus, the False Claims Act is often applied in the health care industry to fight fraud, and specifically fraud committed by hospitals. Whistleblowers who report this fraud receive 15-25% of the amount recovered.

Why should you Attend: Much confusion lies around the whistleblower laws or claims brought under the False Claims Act. A whistleblower or qui tam action can provide financial rewards to individuals who are retaliated against for providing information that a company or individual has defrauded the government. To the contrary, if the government finds that you have engaged in fraud against the government and you could be potentially be named in a whistleblower suit and be prosecuted civilly and/or criminally. Because state and federal governments pay hundreds of billions of dollars each year for healthcare, fraud waste and abuse are particularly rampant in hospital settings.

Attend this 60-minute webinar to understand the framework of the False Claims Act (or whistleblower statute), the procedures for filing a False Claims Act case, and the importance in protecting the court's seal. I will also discuss the pros/cons of bringing a case and important information you should bring to the attention of the government and the attorney representing you.

Areas Covered in the Session:
  • The elements of a False Claims Act case will be explained.
  • Types of False Claims Act cases brought in hospital and healthcare settings.
  • Examples of False Claims Act cases that have been successful and have recovered money for the government and rewarded whistleblowers for reporting fraud.
  • Tools to be used to spot a potential whistleblower case and documentation needed to report the case.

Who Will Benefit: This webinar will provide valuable assistance to all personnel in: medical offices, practice groups, hospitals, academic medical centers, business associates (shredding, data storage, systems vendors, billing services, etc). The titles are:
  • Compliance director
  • CEO
  • CFO
  • Privacy Officer
  • Security Officer
  • Information Systems Manager
  • HIPAA Officer
  • Chief Information Officer
  • Health Information Manager
  • Healthcare Counsel/lawyer
  • Office Manager
  • Contracts Manager
  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • Medical Staff
Shauna B. Itri Represents whistle blowers in False Claims Act law suits in state and federal courts throughout the United States, and tax and securities whistle blowers with claims under the IRS and SEC whistle blower programs. Ms. Itri has worked on a series of False Claims Act cases against large drug companies for fraudulent Medicare and Medicaid drug pricing. This litigation has returned well over $1 billion to state and federal governments pursuant to the Federal and State False Claims Acts.

Ms. Itri also has experience representing shareholders in securities class action cases that have recovered millions of dollars in settlements. Ms. Itri received a B.A. and an M.A. from Stanford University, where she captioned the University’s Women’s soccer team and received her J.D. from Villanova University. Shauna is presently an adjunct professor at Widener Law School and Villanova University, teaching corporate deviance courses. Ms. Itri was named a "Pennsylvania Super Lawyer Rising Star" in 2010-2013 by Philadelphia Magazine after an extensive nomination and polling process among Pennsylvania lawyers. She was placed on Philadelphia's First Judicial District's 2010 and 2011 Roll of Honor for Pro Bono Service for her service in the community.

Shauna currently serves as co-chair of Stanford University Alumni Undergraduate Admissions Volunteer Interview Program and as the Chief Operating Officer and Board Member of the Junior League of Philadelphia, Inc. an organization of approximately 800 women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women, and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers.