Help your Students Develop Self-Regulation Skills to Improve Behavior and Increase Learning K-3

MentorHealth
Date: Wednesday July 24, 2019
Time:

10:00 AM PDT | 01:00 PM EDT

Duration: 90 Minutes
Instructor: Kathy Kaluza Morris
Webinar Id: 801730
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This webinar will address strategies that meet the needs of those children who are impacted by these differences in their brain maturation. However, the participant will realize that these strategies apply to ALL children! 

Overview:

This webinar will address strategies that meet the needs of children 3-5 who are impacted by different rates of maturation for self-regulation.The purpose is to provide practical tools for those clinicians, educators, therapists or parents who are directly involved in working with children 3-5 and slightly older.

Numerous visual supports to address inhibitory control, social skills, and mental flexibility, will be presented through demonstrations and videos. However, there may be administrators, social workers, university professors, therapists, state and national service center consultants who may want to share the information with their clients and audiences

Why should you Attend: Children who struggle with self -regulation often look like those who just aren't paying attention, have difficulty making transitions or are purposely not controlling themselves. They may be unaware of the connections of their behavior and the consequences of the behavior. If you don't have self-regulation, you may act out, refuse to share, resulting in tantrums or meltdowns, get placed in timeout, sent to the principal's office, then miss important learning time. A downward spiral occurs as the child gets more upset and continues to act out when given punitive consequences.

Executive functioning begins to emerge around 4 years of age. Expecting a 2 or 3 year old to recognize social parameters and to be responsible for his actions may be farfetched but these skills can be taught. It's just like going to the gym. The more one practices these strategies for self-regulation, the neural connections will be strengthened.

However, what happens when the prefrontal lobe and frontal cortex are compromised due to faulty brain wiring and sensory traffic jams, such as seen in autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit disorders, anxiety disorders, mood disturbances, behavior disorders, post-traumatic disorders, poverty, attachment disorders?

This webinar will address strategies that meet the needs of those children who are impacted by these differences in their brain maturation. However, the participant will realize that these strategies apply to ALL children!

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • Strategies to address anxiety
  • Games for teaching impulse control,focusing,sharing
  • Mindfulness in young children
  • Visual supports
  • How to physically structure the classroom for self-regulation

Who Will Benefit:
  • Teachers (General Education and Special Education)
  • Parents of Teens
  • Social Workers
  • Counselors
  • Administrators
  • Speech Therapists
  • Occupational Therapists

Speaker Profile
Kathy Kaluza Morris has been a special educator for 45 years, serving as a speech therapist, self-contained teacher of students with behavior disorders, moderate to severe developmental disabilities as well as a resource teacher and first grade teacher.

She served as a diagnostician and supervisor in a district where she opened up the first two LIFE Skills programs in the state of Texas before becoming a consultant for autism, behavior and inclusion at a region service center in Texas. Starting her own business, igivuWings, in 1999 she provides seminars nationally and internationally. She served on the President's Commission on Special Education, was Teacher of the Year and recently, she and her husband were honored by the ARC of Texas with the Lifetime Achievement Award Serving Persons with Disabilities.

Kathy and her husband, Guy, "walk the walk and talk the talk" since the birth of their twin sons with developmental disabilities, including autism and cerebral palsy.


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